The Music of Childhood

 

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I mean this literally. I frequently watch PBS because they show some wonderful concerts of all genres of music, some quite retro or obscure. I love it as I have a brief background managing rock bands and I listen(ed) to a whole lotta different types of artists and music. It was a blast and is now part of my matured (giggle) playlist of current tunes.

The other day, PBS presented a 2hour special about a band that was dear and close to my heart growing up in the late sixties and seventies. This band and their music, in fact, shaped much of my adolescence and teens. I evolved into a rock and roll girl…but during that period I was all about…The Carpenters. I know, I know…but they had some amazing songs and the musical arrangements Richard Carpenter put together were astounding in their complexity and perfection. Karen Carpenter had the voice of an angel. She was my first girl crush. I wanted and got a drum set because I thought it was so cool that a girl could play. While I loved all of their “hits”, I took to some of their lesser known material and would play the songs over and over…my brother banging on the wall of the next room yelling, “How many more times are you going to play that?” Giggle…oh plenty Bro!

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Hearing these songs again (I have not heard them for many, many, many…years) washed over me like a gentle but large tidal wave. I hardly expected it. I sat down to watch just for fun and nostalgia’s sake…but I came away moved…and dare I say, changed just a little. It is interesting to note (pun unintended but stays) how much music does affect, influence, and shape our lives. We all hear certain tunes that sway us to recall the times in our lives that these melodies flowed through. So listening to these songs, all at once and together, really formed a vessel to ride that tidal wave of memories…but not only memories…because music evokes emotions, so when the memories come, so do the emotions attached to them. I remembered it all, some good, some not, but it was all Me.

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It was moving, but not in a bad way. I just…well, transcended for 2 hours to that time in my life, which I intentionally do not think about every day. I mean, adolescence and teens are some of the most profound years and we all have wonderful and horrid memories of them. But…because this music was so important to me back then, I began to remember parts of me, pieces of things, blips I hadn’t had on my radar…and in an odd way, it filled up a part of me I (now for the cliché) didn’t exactly know wasn’t entirely filled. Like small pieces of the puzzle inched toward the bigger picture and went, oh, that’s where I fit in.

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These days afterward I feel altered just a bit, but for a better fit into my whole self. Does that make sense? (she asks shaking her head!).

If you haven’t or never do listen to Music of Your Childhood…I strongly recommend it. Not a song here or there, sit down for an afternoon and “pull out all the old tunes”. (whatever that means in this digital age).  Just sit and relax into the music, let your mind wander and your heart and soul follow. Are there some things there, some feelings, some things that you lost along the way? Would it make you feel better to let them back in again? Would it open any doors that might have been closed? Is there magic in those tunes, words, and melodies that belongs back in your Self?

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I can tell you, that is how I felt, and it was good. Have fun with it…and may the Music of Childhood bring you closer to YourSelf and make you fall in Love all over again…with You!

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Blessings!

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10 comments on “The Music of Childhood

  1. The Carpenters had all that mello going on.

    I taught my kids classics like: “Grandma’s in the Cellar, Lordy can’t you smell ‘er.” And “A Crazy, mixed up song” (Twas midnight on the ocean not a streetcar was in sight…) And when they were old enough they were introduced to Metallica. I was a bit of an outside-the-box mother. 🙂

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